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What Is Erectile Dysfunction?

Impotence, or erectile dysfunction, is defined as the loss of a man’s ability to have and maintain an erection. This can either be due to physical or psychological factors, or a combination of both. Although these psychological factors may be difficult for the man to admit, men who cannot have an erection may still have a strong sexual drive and can feel quite vulnerable about the impotence.

More common in older men, situations such as marital problems; stress; anxiety; certain types of medication; alcohol; smoking; diabetes; high blood pressure; money issues; are among the most notable factors. Severe depression may also play a part in this condition as well. It should be noted, however, that even though a man cannot maintain an erection for psychological reasons, he may continue to have erections during the night. While he may have a problem with one partner, he may not have the same problem with another. Therefore, the cause can be with either him or his partner.

Erectile dysfunction is easily diagnosed, and treatment may be prescribed according to the degree to which the cause is recognized. There are medications available today which offer relief, such as the now popular blue pill – Viagra. While there are other medications now on the market, such as Levitra and Cialis, a more focused treatment may be indicated. This would entail delving into the man’s lifestyle and making necessary changes. As with any condition, preventative measures should be taken to avoid any continued or lost-lasting problems later on. To this end, it is suggested that men should limit their alcohol use and stop smoking.

Moreover, if it is determined the condition is a result of psychological problems; a visit with a psychologist for both the man and his partner would be called for. Other treatments may involve using an external vacuum erection device which draws blood into the penis; injecting the medication prostacyclin E into the penis; surgery to slow blood flow or improve the flow to the penis; or inserting prosthesis into the penis via surgery.

Finally, the most important way in which to deal with erectile dysfunction is to talk about it with your partner. If it is a psychological problem, then as with anything else, talking helps to allay your fears; explain your feelings; and perhaps through constant dialogue, the condition may disappear.

Because erectile dysfunction has a connotation about a man’s performance attached to it, there are men who will ignore the problem, only to find later it is irreversible. Today, men and women discuss health issues; money issues; children issues – even sexual issues. Why not then be as open about erectile dysfunction as you are about those topics. It’s nothing to be ashamed about.

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